17 9 / 2014

ivyblossom:

  • Shipping is the act of enjoying the idea of two characters being in a romantic relationship with each other.
  • The vast majority of the time, you can’t be wrong about shipping. Because shipping is enjoying the idea of two characters being in a romantic relationship with each other, and the vast…

17 9 / 2014

"They love each other, but not in a sexual way… Series four, series four."

Mark Gatiss in 2011 - when we only had Sherlock Series 1, btw (x)

if it’s really series 4 and not series 5, and if they knew it would be series 4 at that time… I will die laughing

(Source: gaykerstreet, via tjlc)

17 9 / 2014

thekneegrope:

"he’s never going to settle for a quiet domestic life in general practice"

image

(via tjlc)

17 9 / 2014

b-cumbz:

if tjlc is not real then why this even exists lol

image

image

x x

(via tjlc)

17 9 / 2014

warmth-and-constancy:

miadifferent:

captainsjm:

But I’m sure that’s just a coincidence and she’s a lovely person.

That’s great! I wondered for so long what it is about this pose in the mind palace. thought, it could be an external reference, but at least it’s creating an internal reference as well!

Shit, the screencaps on my dash just keep getting better and better.

(via shinka)

17 9 / 2014

shylocks:

nondeducible:

hislastbough:

deducethegay:

ben-c:

so, just wondering, have you ever heard a bisexual person vehemently and indignantly insist “i’m not gay!” in an offended manner when accused of dating a person of the same sex? just wondering.

yes as closeted bisexual i often said “i’m not gay!”, because i was confused and frightened by my sexuality. i got extremely defensive and offended when people hinted i liked the same sex.

so there, no need to wonder anymore!

wow!! i too, as a bisexual have often in the past reassured people “i’m
not gay!” in a situation where i am discussing sexual identities because i was also scared of the consequences of admitting that i am attracted to more than one gender! insightful, huh?! :)

gosh yes, what a coincidence, i did that too! i was a closeted bisexual for years and insisted i was not gay because i didn’t fully understand my sexuality and was scared of the rampant homophobia around me. hope this helps your insightful question xoxo

In addition to all these experiences (and gosh, if you look at the notes of this post there really are plenty of bisexual people who have said “i’m not gay!”), I feel like it’d be useful of me to share that it is not unprecedented for bisexual or queer fictional characters either! In fact there’s quite a (recent) history of fictional characters getting intensely defensive about their alleged feelings for another character of the same gender as them and saying variants of “i’m not gay!”, and then guess what? They usually end up in a relationship with said character! Here are a few examples of this exactly! Hope this helps too :3

(LOL that link is gold.)

(via wsswatson)

17 9 / 2014

vowofsherlock:

kinklock:

dammit-sherlock:

kinklock:

What really gets me about Mary is that she is the classic femme fatale from a film noir, like the exact definition, and it’s such a shame people aren’t appreciating that to its fullest. Femme fatales are always initially presented as the innocent dame that turn out to be liars and usually killers, like that’s straight up what Mary is.

The parallels are so strong too though - like, in The Maltese Falcon, one of the most famous film noirs really, it’s revealed at the end of the movie that the main character’s partner in detective work was murdered by their female client who turns out to not be who she claimed to be (this is also mirrored by the falcon itself also turning out to be a fake, which is the object she takes part in delivering). And, even though he’s in love with her, he sends her off to be hanged for her crimes and explains to her that avenging his partner’s death takes precedence over any mutual love they might feel for each other. Sort of sounds?? a LOT like Mary and the AGRA key ?? If you follow the logic you’ll also see what John’s probably going do in the future. Embrace the femme fatale friends. 

Also, take a look at the promotional pictures:

image

image

"Classic femme fatale from a film noir" indeed.

I DONT THINK YOU UNDERSTAND the first time the femme fatale from the maltese falcon is seen on screen she is entirely wrapped in a fur shawl just like that one !!!!!!!

image

seriously though

17 9 / 2014

mild-lunacy:

musthaveblackedout:

fuckyeahfightlock:

So I honestly can’t believe I’ve never seen anyone talking about the art direction of this scene. If I’m repeating something, Ah,well. But I’ve honestly never seen it pointed out that this is the very first time we see Mary, and there are three important things here:
Mary reaches for John’s hand. John takes it, of course—he is used to being offered comfort for his loss, by now—but he is not reaching out to her for comfort in his sadness. She is inserting herself into his grief. Reflexively, he lets her.
We only see the back of her. It’s unusual to introduce a major protagonist any other way than by showing their face pretty much immediately. A major antagonist, however…a baddie…well, they often are introduced in a cloud of cigarette smoke, from a distance, in the shadows, as a mysterious voice on a phone, or in some other way that doesn’t tell us right away who they are. Our first glimpse of Mary gives us only the most vague information about her. Obviously a woman, obviously someone John is close to, as he holds her hand. Other than that…who is she? We don’t know.
Finally, it’s no mistake she is wearing a long, grey coat which flares slightly from the waist, and a blue scarf. But they are paler shades of those colours than Sherlock’s coat and scarf were, because Mary is but a pale imitation of the person we are used to seeing standing beside John Watson (even once, when they were handcuffed together, holding John Watson’s hand in a manner similar to what we see here). Her coat and scarf look cheap, “less than,” and her denim jeans are “less” than Sherlock Holmes’s designer trousers. Her dark hat is a visual echo of Sherlock’s dark hair. This whole shot is set up not only to remind us that Sherlock used to stand here at John Watson’s side, but also that This is some lesser, fake, replacement-Sherlock standing at John Watson’s side, and whether consciously or unconsciously, John has chosen a pale imitation indeed.

This

is how

the show

introduces

Read More

mild-lunacy:

musthaveblackedout:

fuckyeahfightlock:

So I honestly can’t believe I’ve never seen anyone talking about the art direction of this scene. If I’m repeating something, Ah,well. But I’ve honestly never seen it pointed out that this is the very first time we see Mary, and there are three important things here:

Mary reaches for John’s hand. John takes it, of course—he is used to being offered comfort for his loss, by now—but he is not reaching out to her for comfort in his sadness. She is inserting herself into his grief. Reflexively, he lets her.

We only see the back of her. It’s unusual to introduce a major protagonist any other way than by showing their face pretty much immediately. A major antagonist, however…a baddie…well, they often are introduced in a cloud of cigarette smoke, from a distance, in the shadows, as a mysterious voice on a phone, or in some other way that doesn’t tell us right away who they are. Our first glimpse of Mary gives us only the most vague information about her. Obviously a woman, obviously someone John is close to, as he holds her hand. Other than that…who is she? We don’t know.

Finally, it’s no mistake she is wearing a long, grey coat which flares slightly from the waist, and a blue scarf. But they are paler shades of those colours than Sherlock’s coat and scarf were, because Mary is but a pale imitation of the person we are used to seeing standing beside John Watson (even once, when they were handcuffed together, holding John Watson’s hand in a manner similar to what we see here). Her coat and scarf look cheap, “less than,” and her denim jeans are “less” than Sherlock Holmes’s designer trousers. Her dark hat is a visual echo of Sherlock’s dark hair. This whole shot is set up not only to remind us that Sherlock used to stand here at John Watson’s side, but also that This is some lesser, fake, replacement-Sherlock standing at John Watson’s side, and whether consciously or unconsciously, John has chosen a pale imitation indeed.

This

is how

the show

introduces

Read More

(via mild-lunacy-deactivated20140917)

17 9 / 2014

221beemine:

cartopathy:

221beemine:

cumberbear:

fuckyeahfightlock:

So I honestly can’t believe I’ve never seen anyone talking about the art direction of this scene. If I’m repeating something, Ah,well. But I’ve honestly never seen it pointed out that this is the very first time we see Mary, and there are three important things here:
Mary reaches for John’s hand. John takes it, of course—he is used to being offered comfort for his loss, by now—but he is not reaching out to her for comfort in his sadness. She is inserting herself into his grief. Reflexively, he lets her.
We only see the back of her. It’s unusual to introduce a major protagonist any other way than by showing their face pretty much immediately. A major antagonist, however…a baddie…well, they often are introduced in a cloud of cigarette smoke, from a distance, in the shadows, as a mysterious voice on a phone, or in some other way that doesn’t tell us right away who they are. Our first glimpse of Mary gives us only the most vague information about her. Obviously a woman, obviously someone John is close to, as he holds her hand. Other than that…who is she? We don’t know.
Finally, it’s no mistake she is wearing a long, grey coat which flares slightly from the waist, and a blue scarf. But they are paler shades of those colours than Sherlock’s coat and scarf were, because Mary is but a pale imitation of the person we are used to seeing standing beside John Watson (even once, when they were handcuffed together, holding John Watson’s hand in a manner similar to what we see here). Her coat and scarf look cheap, “less than,” and her denim jeans are “less” than Sherlock Holmes’s designer trousers. Her dark hat is a visual echo of Sherlock’s dark hair. This whole shot is set up not only to remind us that Sherlock used to stand here at John Watson’s side, but also that This is some lesser, fake, replacement-Sherlock standing at John Watson’s side, and whether consciously or unconsciously, John has chosen a pale imitation indeed.

I love this, it’s brilliant. Just want to add… the black hat, I’ve never even noticed this before but it completely blocks out every part of her head/face, you can’t even see her hair. To me it’s like a nod to the ‘real’ Mary, the assassin who we see in HLV dressed all in black with a gun to Sherlock. That’s what people do when they do bad things, they dress to disguise and hide themselves so as not to be recognisable. They’ve put her in that staple ‘bad guy’ hat (when they so easily could have had her in something lighter/less threatening) right from the very start. They’re telling us from the first second we see her that she’s not to be trusted. Just brilliant.

So good. All these little hints—even the first time I saw the promo shot of her from before S3, in her purple dress with the black jewels, I thought “what a film noir femme fatale”—the black jewelry really had an impact on character design. Imagine if she had been decked in pearls instead on the night of the engagement scene? These little touches add so much.
If I have any predictions about S4 or the Christmas special, it’s that Mary is going to be dressed in a lot of red, her other major defining color. Gray, red, that smoky purple, black—these are her mystery/assassin colors; blue is in scenes where she is strongly aligned with John (reading the blog/shaving scene; planning the wedding with John and Sherlock).

I like too that it’s the same view of her that Sherlock gets when he walks in on her in CAM’s office. It’s like, when she finally turns around in that scene, she is finally turning around in this scene to look at us. To reveal herself. But here she doesn’t turn around, because here she is still disguised. That means that Mart Morstan, the woman John married, is not in any way the real person who is here. With John she is completely disguised. We don’t see her, we don’t even see a glimpse of who she is with John.We don’t see a glimpse of who she really is until she shoots Sherlock.

Reblogging with caps for @cartopathy’s observation.

221beemine:

cartopathy:

221beemine:

cumberbear:

fuckyeahfightlock:

So I honestly can’t believe I’ve never seen anyone talking about the art direction of this scene. If I’m repeating something, Ah,well. But I’ve honestly never seen it pointed out that this is the very first time we see Mary, and there are three important things here:

Mary reaches for John’s hand. John takes it, of course—he is used to being offered comfort for his loss, by now—but he is not reaching out to her for comfort in his sadness. She is inserting herself into his grief. Reflexively, he lets her.

We only see the back of her. It’s unusual to introduce a major protagonist any other way than by showing their face pretty much immediately. A major antagonist, however…a baddie…well, they often are introduced in a cloud of cigarette smoke, from a distance, in the shadows, as a mysterious voice on a phone, or in some other way that doesn’t tell us right away who they are. Our first glimpse of Mary gives us only the most vague information about her. Obviously a woman, obviously someone John is close to, as he holds her hand. Other than that…who is she? We don’t know.

Finally, it’s no mistake she is wearing a long, grey coat which flares slightly from the waist, and a blue scarf. But they are paler shades of those colours than Sherlock’s coat and scarf were, because Mary is but a pale imitation of the person we are used to seeing standing beside John Watson (even once, when they were handcuffed together, holding John Watson’s hand in a manner similar to what we see here). Her coat and scarf look cheap, “less than,” and her denim jeans are “less” than Sherlock Holmes’s designer trousers. Her dark hat is a visual echo of Sherlock’s dark hair. This whole shot is set up not only to remind us that Sherlock used to stand here at John Watson’s side, but also that This is some lesser, fake, replacement-Sherlock standing at John Watson’s side, and whether consciously or unconsciously, John has chosen a pale imitation indeed.

I love this, it’s brilliant. Just want to add… the black hat, I’ve never even noticed this before but it completely blocks out every part of her head/face, you can’t even see her hair. To me it’s like a nod to the ‘real’ Mary, the assassin who we see in HLV dressed all in black with a gun to Sherlock. That’s what people do when they do bad things, they dress to disguise and hide themselves so as not to be recognisable. They’ve put her in that staple ‘bad guy’ hat (when they so easily could have had her in something lighter/less threatening) right from the very start. They’re telling us from the first second we see her that she’s not to be trusted. Just brilliant.

So good. All these little hints—even the first time I saw the promo shot of her from before S3, in her purple dress with the black jewels, I thought “what a film noir femme fatale”—the black jewelry really had an impact on character design. Imagine if she had been decked in pearls instead on the night of the engagement scene? These little touches add so much.

If I have any predictions about S4 or the Christmas special, it’s that Mary is going to be dressed in a lot of red, her other major defining color. Gray, red, that smoky purple, black—these are her mystery/assassin colors; blue is in scenes where she is strongly aligned with John (reading the blog/shaving scene; planning the wedding with John and Sherlock).

I like too that it’s the same view of her that Sherlock gets when he walks in on her in CAM’s office. It’s like, when she finally turns around in that scene, she is finally turning around in this scene to look at us. To reveal herself.

But here she doesn’t turn around, because here she is still disguised. That means that Mart Morstan, the woman John married, is not in any way the real person who is here.

With John she is completely disguised. We don’t see her, we don’t even see a glimpse of who she is with John.

We don’t see a glimpse of who she really is until she shoots Sherlock.

Reblogging with caps for @cartopathy’s observation.

17 9 / 2014

writemeastoryofsolitude:

A while ago I saw some discussion about the idea of Sherlock having definite “film noir” elements and Mary as a “black hat,” and then again recently about Mary being a classic example of the femme fatale.  All very interesting stuff, and an area of cinema I wish I knew a bit more about, beyond the bare bones provided by Film 101 in college, BUT—if there’s one thing I can do to death when my interest is piqued, it’s research like a champ.  (Meaning: I didn’t sleep at all last night, instead I stayed up to look into this whole thing more deeply so you’re all obligated to spread this around, sorry, I don’t make the rules.)

Read More